Tag Archives: WW2

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Dresden

Dresden

Dresden

Walking around Dresden surrounded by some pretty amazing architecture.

The Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe

The Memorial 

the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe
the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe

Located between the Brandenburg Gate and Potsdamer Platz is the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe.  Peter Eisenman, the designer of this memorial, created a plan that would consists of the Field of Stelae standing on 4.7-acre site. This Field of Stalae, consist of 2,711 concrete slabs, which are 7’10” long and 3’1” wide but vary in height (8” to 15’9”).  Eisenman wanted to create a design that would produce an uneasy, confusing atmosphere aiming to “represent a supposedly ordered system that has lost touch with human reason”. As the viewer begins to move through the piece, they begin to see that these tall structures are placed on a sloping ground.  The combination of the growing evenly placed slabs on a slopping field certainly contributes to the an anxious feeling one can get when entering this site.

** I had a video of me walking through it but am having trouble uploading it. Sorry

Memorial

For more information on this memorial: http://www.stiftung-denkmal.de/en/memorials/the-memorial-to-the-murdered-jews-of-

Bedřich Fritta

Bedřich Fritta

Inside of the Jewish museum was a collection of work by the artist Bedřich Fritta. Bedřich Fritta was a Jewish artist trained in Paris who was later taken to the Theresienstadt ghetto during the second War. Here Fritta supervised the drawing studio of the Jewish technical department. There were up to 20 imprisoned artists working to produce construction plans and illustrations for reports that had to be sent to the SS commandant’s office. The illustrations that they were produced were to show the ghetto as a smoothly functioning, self governed model settlement. They were to hide the truth that was the misery and horror this “model” concentration camp was really.

Bedřich Fritta, Facades for the International Commission, 1943/44 Ink, pen and brush, 57 x 84,5 cm © Thomas Fritta-Haas, long-term loan to the Jewish Museum Berlin, photo: Jens Ziehe
Bedřich Fritta, Facades for the International Commission, 1943/44
Ink, pen and brush, 57 x 84,5 cm<

The drawings that were on display were not this officially commissioned works but the unofficial drawings Fritta hid depicting the truth of the Theresienstadt ghetto. These works he created in inks and pen, later hiding in the walls of this place. The strongly contrasted drawings evoke the pain and ghastliness that Fritta must have felt each day. They depict the malnourished inhabitants and paint a truly dreadful picture of life for the victims of this war. In a few works it even illustrates how those running this ghetto would embellish the area when visitors came, hiding bodies and “fixing up” the model Jewish inhabitants.

Bedřich Fritta, The Life of a Privileged Detainee, 1943/44 Pen and ink, 58,3 x 74 cm © Thomas Fritta-Haas, long-term loan to the Jewish Museum Berlin, photo: Jens Ziehe
Bedřich Fritta, The Life of a Privileged Detainee, 1943/44
Pen and ink, 58,3 x 74 cm

I find it this work to be a true testimony of how strong this artist was during this trying time.  Despite knowing the amount of trouble he could encounter, the hardships and injustice he saw pushed him to create this work. There was one piece that really touched me. It was a small movie that was made of a book he drew or his son Tomas for his third birthday. Unfortunately, these unofficial drawings were found, sending Fritta and his family to a Gestapo jail. Later Fritta was sent to Auschwitz where he died of exhaustion.

Bedřich Fritta, "To Tommy, for His Third Birthday in Terezin, 22 January 1944"
Bedřich Fritta, “To Tommy, for His Third Birthday in Terezin, 22 January 1944” © Thomas Fritta-Haas, loan to the Jewish Museum Berlin, photo: Jens Ziehe